F.W. Kent Park


Featured Events
»   Winter Hike and Picnic
February 10 - February 10, 2018   11:00 - 12:00 AM
»  more events
F.W. Kent park is located three miles west of Tiffin on Highway 6.  This park is the home of the Johnson County Conservation Board Headquarters and the Conservation Education Center.  The 1,052 acres provide numerous recreational opportunities.    

Location

Oxford, Iowa - USA

Features

  • The Conservation Education Center is utilized year-road for educational programs and workshops.  Youth and adult groups can work with the JCCB naturalist to schedule conservation-related programs in this building.
  • More than nine miles of hiking trails wind through F.W. Kent Park's many native communities.  The crushed rock trail around the lake provides anglers with access to the entire shoreline.  In the winter cross-country skiing is a popular activity.
  • Seven historic county road bridges have been relocated to F.W. Kent Park and utilized on the trail around the 27-acre lake and another crosses Pond #2.
  • The Youth Group Camp is available for organized youth groups for day or overnight use.  A large enclosed shelter building and five campsites are available by permit use only.  Call (319) 645-2315 for reservations.
  • Six open picnic shelters (four are reservable), picnic tables and fire grills are available throughout F.W. Kent Park.  To reserve a shelter or inquire about other park services, contact the Conservation Headquarters at (319) 645-2315.
  • The campground provides 86  sites with  20/30/50 amp electrical service, modern restrooms, shower facilities and a playground.  The campground is open from mid-April through October 31. Cost for camping is $20.00 per site.
  • Kent Park beach is open from the Saturday of Memorial Day through Labor Day.  There are no life guards on duty; swim at your own risk.
  • The Knight Prairie Pavilion, located on the west side of the park, overlooks 100 acres of prairie and wetlands.  It provides park visitors with an excellent opportunity to learn about prairie ecosystems through self-guiding exhibit panels.


Related Items